Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Mount Beckwith or Mount Beckworth

History of Mount Beckwith (Beckworth)

FROM FRIENDS OF MOUNT BECKWORTH WEBSITE:
Koori History
Little is known of pre-European settlement in our area. Only a few known relics remain from the Dja Dja Wrung tribe which occupied an area of 15,600 square kilometres that includes Mount Beckworth. One source states that Mount Beckworth was known to aboriginal people as "Korepunbrlite Gudidji" which means "belonging to" and the area around Mount Beckworth and Clunes was known as "Gurabungalid". There were many tribal sub-groups in the district, including the Gul Gul Balug from the Mount Mitchell/Burnbank area.
...
Naming Mount Beckworth

Major Mitchell passed through the area in 1836 and named "Mount Beckwith" for Thomas Sidney Beckwith who had served in Mitchell's 95th Regiment; he later became Lieutenant General Sir Sidney Beckwith.


Mount Beckwith, Mount Beckworth and discoveries of gold
Mount Beckwith, a granitic ridge, is about five miles to the West. The gold is found disseminated in several parallel quartz veins or dykes, which pass through this mass of trap, and protrude from it on the steep banks of the valley. There is no tract of auriferous alluvium. The gold is almost entirely derived from the quartz vein itself. Hence the works here would be more properly characterized as mining than digging.


Sunday, September 28, 2003

Plimpton, Plumpton and Beckwith



Plimpton, Plumpton and Beckwith
A Genealogy and Historical Notices of the Family of Plimpton or Plympton in America and of Plumpton in England (on microfiche)
by Levi B. Chase, pub. 1884.
The first 22 pages concerns the family of Plympton in England. The majority of this book contains the descendants of John and Thomas Plympton. John Plympton, the first to come to America, served as an indentured servant to pay for his passage. He later married Jane Dammin at Dedham, Massachusetts in 1644. The stories of new settlements, encounters with the Indians, anecdotes of the first settlers, biographies, along with wills, inventories, passenger and other lists, make this a valuable history. There are 240 pages on 3 microfiche.


Plimptons and Plumptons from the Boyd House genealogy page. Note the Knaresborough reference.

Elizabeth Plumpton (born circa 1424) married Sir William Beckwith also of Yorkshire, England. She was the daughter of either Sir William Plumpton, knight, or Sir Dennis Plumpton.




A personal remembrance of this ancient soul who has just passed from us:

George Plimpton, among other things, was a great fan of pyrotechnics...and it was in this context that I first made my acquaintance with the lofty old soul.

It was in the early 1980s in Boston, and Mr. Plimpton was to host an international fireworks festival. George introduced each country's firework presentation, describing the subtleties and techniques employed. And while the display was taking place, an orchestra would feature that country's music.

The French were really good with pastels; the English were good at causing the fireworks to sort of park themselves in the air, then branch off in different directions, then repeat the process. The Japanese fireworks were most similar to viewing a computer screen, and the fireworks seemed to directed at the stationary viewer. Palimpsests were also quite excellent. The Chinese had perhaps the strangest. A dozen strings of glowing red apples that slowly drifted across the sky, in time with the music. Very subtle. Very different from the American fireworks that finished off the evening...and, by the way, won the competition. To me they merely looked like a battleship had pulled up to the shore and just starting opening fire on the crowd. Huge white fireballs.
Goodness gracious!

For his myriad interests which he shared with the world, George Plimpton will be missed and remembered. I shant expect to have a more scintillating experience of the world of pyrotechnics, literary or otherwise. The world of letters owes him a debt of honor.




Friday, September 26, 2003

George Washington Letters

George Washington Letters

George Washington to William Pearce

George Washington to William Pearce 2

More...

George Washington To THE CITIZENS OF FREDERICK COUNTY,
VIRGINIA

Addressed to Gen. Daniel Morgan (the gentleman reputed to have shared the soul of George W. Bush), Charles M. Thornton [Thruston], Robert White, jr., Charles Magill, and Joseph Caldwell, the committee which forwarded the resolution.

See: Clarke County, Virginia



Saturday, September 20, 2003

Old Prints - UK

Old Prints - UK
Huge selection

views

Troutbeck
Skelwith
Dacre
Yew Tree Tarn

Yankee Magazine - Yankee Extras for October



Florence Griswold Museum
Old Lyme, Ct
(From Yankee Magazine)

The Flo Gris has a new riverfront gallery to display the 200 paintings it received from the Hartford Steam Boiler Company, securing the museum's place as "the home of American Impressionism" with the country's largest collection.

Beckwith Builders of New Hampshire





Beckwith Builders of New Hampshire

"I want one!"


Saturday, September 13, 2003

Decline and Resistance - Old Virginia - Virginia Historical Society

Decline and Resistance - Old Virginia - Virginia Historical Society
(Including Ripon Hall, home of Edmund Jenings)

Portraits of Byrd, Carter
...of Robert Carter III of Nomini:
In 1772 Carter abruptly retired from Williamsburg to his plantation, Nomini Hall, on the Potomac River. In time he repudiated the major institutions of colonial gentry society: he abandoned politics, he gave up life as a planter, and he deserted the Anglican Church, becoming a Baptist in 1778. Carter was ambivalent about many aspects of Virginia life, including slavery, at times defending it and at others calling it a depravity; he eventually freed his nearly 500 slaves. In the end, he escaped rural Virginia for residence in the city of Baltimore, the family home of his wife, Frances Ann Tasker. There he became a Swedenborgian disciple.




VA/NY Genealogy

VA and NY SurnamesHenry Corbin, Jennings, etc...

Thursday, September 11, 2003

Sabine Hall

Carter Family Cemetery, Sabine Hall

The Mount Airy Stud Farm of Virginia
From the site:
The estate built by John Tayloe II, in 1747, and later maintained by his son, John Tayloe III, was among the outstanding stud farms of colonial Virginia. The Tayloes owned and raced such important horses as Childers, who was imported in 1751 and proved to be a sire of great mares. Childers returned to racing after six seasons at stud. At the ripe old age of 13, he carried 180 pounds, and finished a five-mile race in 12 minutes 27 seconds to win 500 pounds. Another Mount Airy horse was Leviathan, who was the first champion gelding in American turf history, winning 23 consecutive races. In 1802, he conceded 70 pounds to an opponent, yet won a five-mile "dash." The younger Tayloe bred his imported mare, Castrinira, to the great Diomed, and the resulting foal was Sir Archie, one of the greatest sires in American Thoroughbred history. The eminence of Mount Airy is evidenced by the fact that between 1791 and 1806, the farm's 141 entries won 113 races - a fantastic record.

also:

But Tayloe put a number of his mares to Diomed, and he liked the results. Diomed sired some of the most famous horses in American turf history. Among them were Haynie's Maria, who beat every horse until she lost one race as a nine-year-old. Andrew Jackson declared that Haynie's Maria "can beat any thing in God's whole creation."... Diomed also sired the undefeated Ball's Florizel, Potomac, Duroc, and greatest of all, Sir Archie, who became a singularly important influence in American Thoroughbred history. He sired the line which extended to Timolean, Boston, and Lexington. When Diomed died at the age of 31, one historian reports, "...there was as much mourning over his demise as there was at the death of George Washington."


Sir Jennings Beckwith's good friend, John Tayloe III of Mt. Airy

George Plater Tayloe of Buena Vista

WYE RIVER PLANTATION - HOME OF THE LLOYDS OF MARYLAND

MT AIRY PLANTATION

MT AIRY PLANTATION RIVER FRONT VIEW

STABLES AT MT. AIRY PLANTATION

MT.AIRY PLANTATION

ANCIENT SUNDIAL AT MT. AIRY PLANTATION

John Tayloe I, father of John Tayloe II (builder of Mt Airy) b. 1687

Col. John Tayloe II

REBECCA PLATER TAYLOE & DAUGHTER MARY

John, Rebecca & Mary

Tayloe Family Cemetery

"BUENA VISTA", ROANOKE, VIRGINIA- HOME OF GEORGE PLATER TAYLOE

OCTAGON HOUSE, TREATY OF GHENT ROOM, JOHN TAYLOE'S STUDY

These and many more wondrous links can be found at The Ogle Family of Maryland Website. Sir Jennings Beckwith was most fond of the Tayloes and Mt Airy, where he died.

See more on John Tayloe III's Octagon House in Washington, DC...where the Treaty of Ghent was signed.